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Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler > Blog List with Right Sidebar (Page 4)

6 Back-to-School Planning Tips for Your Child With Special Needs

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler For a few glorious weeks each year, classrooms are replaced with trips to the Shore, and your family’s summer vacation makes waiting for the school bus seems like a distant memory. Yet, while it may feel like the year has just ended, it’s never too soon to start planning for your child’s return to school in September. Here are 6 tips to help make the transition successful. Share your child’s IEP with appropriate staff members. The most important resource you and your child’s teachers share is the Individualized Education Program or IEP. Provide a copy of...

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6 Inclusive summer programming options in NJ to check out

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler If you’re still considering summer programming options for your child with special needs, here are six wonderful camps/summer schools in New Jersey that can provide activities for kids of all ages. Each inclusive program will ensure that your child has equal opportunities to be included in recreational settings so they can learn and play together. Fusion Academy Princeton Fusion Academy offers a summer school that won’t take away your summer fun! Middle and high school students can catch up on missed credits, retake a class, get ahead before next semester, or supplement a homeschool program with an...

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5 Things to consider when choosing a guardian to name in your Will

Written by Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Choosing a guardian to name in your Will When handing your will and estate planning, one of the most important decisions you’ll have to make is who will take care of your children if you become incapacitated or in the event of your death. “If you don't name a legal guardian in your will, the court will choose who will care for your children,” says Alex Hilsen, Esq., LL.M., head of SGW’s Estate Planning Division. “And you can’t assume that they will automatically grant custody to aunts, uncles, or grandparents.” When drawing up your will, be sure that...

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Does my child need an extended school year?

Written by  Mariann Crincoli, Esq. An extended school year (ESY) refers to educational programming beyond the required 180-day school year for students with disabilities who are eligible. Although every student with a disability who has an individualized education program (IEP) must be considered for ESY, not every student is eligible for ESY. The determination, like all other programming decisions for students with disabilities, must be made annually on an individual basis by the IEP team. Parents are a valuable member of the IEP team and must be part of this decision-making process. Several factors must be utilized by the IEP team in...

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The fundamentals of Estate Planning: How to protect your family’s future

One of the best ways to help assure that your assets will be managed for your family as you intend is to develop a comprehensive estate plan designed to meet your individual needs. The estate planning process typically involves working with your financial, tax and legal advisors to develop a customized estate plan. Many estate plans include the following: Last Wills and Testaments Durable Financial Powers of Attorney Advance Medical Directives Revocable and/or Irrevocable Trusts Insurance Trusts Charitable Remainder Trusts Minor's Trusts - Spendthrift Trusts By-Pass or Credit Shelter Trusts Marital Trusts (QTIP) Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts or Grantor Retained Uni-Trusts ...

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Type of Trusts

There are two basic types of trusts: living trusts and testamentary trusts. A Living Trust or an “inter-vivos” trust is set up during the person’s lifetime. A Testamentary trust is set up in a will and established only after the person’s death when the will goes into effect. Living trusts can be either “revocable” or “irrevocable.” Revocable trusts allow you to retain control of all the assets in the trust, and you are free to revoke or change the terms of the trust at any time. With irrevocable trusts, the assets in it are no longer yours, and typically you can’t make changes without the beneficiary’s consent....

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Is your child with special needs ready to graduate?

Written by Mariann Crincoli, Esq. As a child approaches his or her 18th birthday, most parents feel a loss of control as he or she officially enters adulthood. Parents of children with special needs have even more reason to be concerned because they have the heavy responsibility of determining whether or not their child is ready to graduate high school and transition to the next phase of life. When evaluating this, it is helpful to know that there are special education laws that will assist you in making informed decisions — one that is best for your child. Firstly, all children with disabilities...

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Five steps to getting the Special Education process started

Written by Mariann Crincoli, Esq. Special education is governed by federal and state law which requires public school districts to provide children with disabilities a free and appropriate public education that is individually tailored to meet a child’s unique needs and prepare her for the future as an independent member of society. If you think your child has special education needs, here’s how you should get the process started: Contact your local public school district and provide them with a written request for a referral to the District’s child study team. Sometimes this referral will come from school personnel who are concerned...

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Independent Educational Evaluations

I REQUESTED AN INDEPENDENT EVALUATION AND THE DISTRICT SAID “NO”: NOW WHAT? One of a parent’s most powerful tools is the right to request an independent educational evaluation at public expense. An independent educational evaluation (or “IEE”) is an evaluation performed by someone other than the local agency responsible for the child’s education. Such evaluations supplement child study team evaluations by providing further information about the child's suspected disabilities and potential need for special education and related services. Parents frequently ask when they can request an IEE, how an IEE can help them advocate for their child, and what to do...

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Planning for your Special Need child’s cack to school

Written by Staci J. Greenwald, Esq. For a few glorious weeks each year, classrooms are replaced with trips to the Shore, and your family’s summer vacation makes waiting for the school bus seem a distant memory. Yet, while it may feel like the year has just ended, it’s never too soon to start planning for your child’s successful return to school in September. Of course, the most important resource you and your child’s teachers share is the Individualized Education Program or IEP. Provide a copy of the IEP to each new staff member who will come into contact with your child each...

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