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Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler > Blog List with Right Sidebar (Page 5)

An action plan for your child who exhibits school refusal

Written by Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler School refusal, a significant, persistent refusal to attend school based on emotional distress, is more common than you think. It can be a terrible dilemma for a parent: You know your child needs to go to school, and you know she is not physically ill, but she still refuses to go and you don’t know what to do about it. She promises every night tomorrow she will go, but when school time approaches, she just can’t get out of the car, throws a tantrum or spends the day in the nurse’s office complaining she does...

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3 ways to help your child with sensory issues succeed in school

Written by Greer Gurland, Esq. Does your child crash into walls? Does he cover his ears in a crowded amusement park or shy away from birthday parties? Does she seem insensitive to pain, or overly sensitive to sound or light? When children have difficulty processing or making sense of the sensory information they take in, they may have difficulty responding appropriately in a given situation or environment. When this difficulty is so severe that it impedes daily functioning, the child may be said to have a Sensory Processing Disorder (an "SPD") also known as Sensory Integration Disorder. An SPD may affect your...

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4 tools to keep children with food allergies safe at school

Written by Greer Gurland, Esq. Many parents of children with life-threatening food allergies know to contact the school’s administration even before the first school bell rings. The goal: To set up a plan to keep their child safe. But starting a productive dialogue about creating a positive school environment—one that allows the child equal access to school programs--can be tough when the ground rules are unclear. As a parent, you can do a lot to help by bringing information to your school team about what the law requires. Then, instead of asking for special help, you can take on the role of...

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What you need you know about special Needs Trusts and Estate Planning for your family’s future

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Alex Hilsen is an attorney and Certified Financial Planner at Sussan Greenwald & Wesler.  In the following interview, he answers some of the most common questions he has fielded lately from his parents. Q: Who needs to think about estate planning and special needs trusts – everyone, or just parents who have children whom they expect will not live independently as adults? A: Everyone with a child should have an estate plan. It lays out or directs how your money will be distributed and who should care for your children in case of emergency or death.  If...

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October is National Bullying Prevention Month – bullying laws protect children with special needs

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Bullying can be a devastating experience for any child. When the child being bullied has special needs, serious and long-term consequences for the child may result. Fortunately, special needs children receive extra protection under the law. Parents can invoke the laws that have been written specifically to protect children with disabilities when instances of bullying occur. Bullying includes physical threats, but it may also encompass verbal abuse (teasing and threats), graphic or written statements, and behavior that creates a hostile environment or infringes on a student's rights at school. In general, bullying involves an imbalance--or a...

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Students with disabilities cannot be barred from gifted and talented programs

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Federal and state law requires that accelerated programs be made available to students with disabilities and that entry requirement for such programs not discriminate against students who require special services. Furthermore, if a student requires modifications such as extended time or a computer for taking notes, the school must provide those same modifications in any accelerated or gifted programming in which that child participates. It has been eight years since a letter issued by the Office of Civil Rights clarified this law for schools and parents. Despite the letter, confusion still seems to exist among...

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Charter Schools

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Owe a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to Special Needs Students What is a charter school? Most people know that charter schools are alternatives to local public schools. Charter schools are public schools, but are operated independently of local boards of education. They usually receive federal money as well as additional private donations or grants. Unlike their local public school counterparts, charter schools are privately managed by their own charter school Board of Trustees. Charter schools have leeway in determining their policies and programming. For this reason, they can be attractive to parents seeking an alternative learning...

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Your child has rights when it comes to food allergy bullying

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Food bullying is not to be taken lightly. For a child with a life threatening allergy, it can mean serious illness or death--not to mention the anxiety and other psychological consequences from experiencing both bullying and physical response to a life-threatening allergen. We now know that fifty percent of children with food allergies who are in grades six through ten reports being the victim of food allergy bullying. Fortunately, the food allergy bullying law has evolved. Education will take more time, as schools, children with allergies, their peers, teachers, administrators, and health care professionals work...

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District Court upholds SGW victory against Summit Schools

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Sussan Greenwald and Wesler together with co-counsel Connell Foley prevailed over Summit Schools in a case that proves that "meaningful education benefit" is a concept that has teeth in New Jersey. On July 27, 2015, in T.O. et al v. Summit City Board of Education, the United States District Court affirmed the July 2, 2012 decision of an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). The A LJ had held that Summit failed to provide a free, appropriate public education to a child, J.O., who suffered from apraxia of speech and dyspraxia. Jayne M. Wesler, a partner at...

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