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Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler > Articles posted by admin (Page 6)

Is your child with special needs ready to graduate?

Written by Mariann Crincoli, Esq. As a child approaches his or her 18th birthday, most parents feel a loss of control as he or she officially enters adulthood. Parents of children with special needs have even more reason to be concerned because they have the heavy responsibility of determining whether or not their child is ready to graduate high school and transition to the next phase of life. When evaluating this, it is helpful to know that there are special education laws that will assist you in making informed decisions — one that is best for your child. Firstly, all children with disabilities...

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Five steps to getting the Special Education process started

Written by Mariann Crincoli, Esq. Special education is governed by federal and state law which requires public school districts to provide children with disabilities a free and appropriate public education that is individually tailored to meet a child’s unique needs and prepare her for the future as an independent member of society. If you think your child has special education needs, here’s how you should get the process started: Contact your local public school district and provide them with a written request for a referral to the District’s child study team. Sometimes this referral will come from school personnel who are concerned...

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Independent Educational Evaluations

I REQUESTED AN INDEPENDENT EVALUATION AND THE DISTRICT SAID “NO”: NOW WHAT? One of a parent’s most powerful tools is the right to request an independent educational evaluation at public expense. An independent educational evaluation (or “IEE”) is an evaluation performed by someone other than the local agency responsible for the child’s education. Such evaluations supplement child study team evaluations by providing further information about the child's suspected disabilities and potential need for special education and related services. Parents frequently ask when they can request an IEE, how an IEE can help them advocate for their child, and what to do...

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Planning for your Special Need child’s cack to school

Written by Staci J. Greenwald, Esq. For a few glorious weeks each year, classrooms are replaced with trips to the Shore, and your family’s summer vacation makes waiting for the school bus seem a distant memory. Yet, while it may feel like the year has just ended, it’s never too soon to start planning for your child’s successful return to school in September. Of course, the most important resource you and your child’s teachers share is the Individualized Education Program or IEP. Provide a copy of the IEP to each new staff member who will come into contact with your child each...

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An action plan for your child who exhibits school refusal

Written by Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler School refusal, a significant, persistent refusal to attend school based on emotional distress, is more common than you think. It can be a terrible dilemma for a parent: You know your child needs to go to school, and you know she is not physically ill, but she still refuses to go and you don’t know what to do about it. She promises every night tomorrow she will go, but when school time approaches, she just can’t get out of the car, throws a tantrum or spends the day in the nurse’s office complaining she does...

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3 ways to help your child with sensory issues succeed in school

Written by Greer Gurland, Esq. Does your child crash into walls? Does he cover his ears in a crowded amusement park or shy away from birthday parties? Does she seem insensitive to pain, or overly sensitive to sound or light? When children have difficulty processing or making sense of the sensory information they take in, they may have difficulty responding appropriately in a given situation or environment. When this difficulty is so severe that it impedes daily functioning, the child may be said to have a Sensory Processing Disorder (an "SPD") also known as Sensory Integration Disorder. An SPD may affect your...

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4 tools to keep children with food allergies safe at school

Written by Greer Gurland, Esq. Many parents of children with life-threatening food allergies know to contact the school’s administration even before the first school bell rings. The goal: To set up a plan to keep their child safe. But starting a productive dialogue about creating a positive school environment—one that allows the child equal access to school programs--can be tough when the ground rules are unclear. As a parent, you can do a lot to help by bringing information to your school team about what the law requires. Then, instead of asking for special help, you can take on the role of...

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What you need you know about special Needs Trusts and Estate Planning for your family’s future

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Alex Hilsen is an attorney and Certified Financial Planner at Sussan Greenwald & Wesler.  In the following interview, he answers some of the most common questions he has fielded lately from his parents. Q: Who needs to think about estate planning and special needs trusts – everyone, or just parents who have children whom they expect will not live independently as adults? A: Everyone with a child should have an estate plan. It lays out or directs how your money will be distributed and who should care for your children in case of emergency or death.  If...

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October is National Bullying Prevention Month – bullying laws protect children with special needs

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Bullying can be a devastating experience for any child. When the child being bullied has special needs, serious and long-term consequences for the child may result. Fortunately, special needs children receive extra protection under the law. Parents can invoke the laws that have been written specifically to protect children with disabilities when instances of bullying occur. Bullying includes physical threats, but it may also encompass verbal abuse (teasing and threats), graphic or written statements, and behavior that creates a hostile environment or infringes on a student's rights at school. In general, bullying involves an imbalance--or a...

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