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Special Needs

Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler > Special Needs (Page 5)

Five steps to getting the Special Education process started

Written by Mariann Crincoli, Esq. Special education is governed by federal and state law which requires public school districts to provide children with disabilities a free and appropriate public education that is individually tailored to meet a child’s unique needs and prepare her for the future as an independent member of society. If you think your child has special education needs, here’s how you should get the process started: Contact your local public school district and provide them with a written request for a referral to the District’s child study team. Sometimes this referral will come from school personnel who are concerned...

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Planning for your Special Need child’s cack to school

Written by Staci J. Greenwald, Esq. For a few glorious weeks each year, classrooms are replaced with trips to the Shore, and your family’s summer vacation makes waiting for the school bus seem a distant memory. Yet, while it may feel like the year has just ended, it’s never too soon to start planning for your child’s successful return to school in September. Of course, the most important resource you and your child’s teachers share is the Individualized Education Program or IEP. Provide a copy of the IEP to each new staff member who will come into contact with your child each...

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What you need you know about special Needs Trusts and Estate Planning for your family’s future

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Alex Hilsen is an attorney and Certified Financial Planner at Sussan Greenwald & Wesler.  In the following interview, he answers some of the most common questions he has fielded lately from his parents. Q: Who needs to think about estate planning and special needs trusts – everyone, or just parents who have children whom they expect will not live independently as adults? A: Everyone with a child should have an estate plan. It lays out or directs how your money will be distributed and who should care for your children in case of emergency or death.  If...

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Charter Schools

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Owe a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to Special Needs Students What is a charter school? Most people know that charter schools are alternatives to local public schools. Charter schools are public schools, but are operated independently of local boards of education. They usually receive federal money as well as additional private donations or grants. Unlike their local public school counterparts, charter schools are privately managed by their own charter school Board of Trustees. Charter schools have leeway in determining their policies and programming. For this reason, they can be attractive to parents seeking an alternative learning...

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Your child has rights when it comes to food allergy bullying

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler Food bullying is not to be taken lightly. For a child with a life threatening allergy, it can mean serious illness or death--not to mention the anxiety and other psychological consequences from experiencing both bullying and physical response to a life-threatening allergen. We now know that fifty percent of children with food allergies who are in grades six through ten reports being the victim of food allergy bullying. Fortunately, the food allergy bullying law has evolved. Education will take more time, as schools, children with allergies, their peers, teachers, administrators, and health care professionals work...

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How to prepare for a substitute teacher when a child has special needs

Written by  Sussan, Greenwald & Wesler “Today We Had a Substitute….” Having a substitute teacher can be welcome news for some students. For those students, it can be a chance to try to break the rules and hopefully do less work. For other students—especially children with special needs—having a substitute teacher can be a source of uncertainly, anxiety, frustration, and fear. In addition, when having a substitute means that special needs kids miss out on receiving needed supports or accommodations, a substitute can mean a difficult day, missed opportunities for learning, and even getting in trouble. It’s not easy to be a substitute...

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A neuropsychologist’s insights about concussion care/an interview with concussion specialist Dr. Jill Brooks

A concussion can happen to any child. Neuropsychologist and concussion specialist Dr. Jill Brooks wants every parent to be prepared with facts about concussion prevention and care. She works closely with patients, their parents, and schools to help concussion patients feel better and return to being productive and active. A concussion is a traumatic brain injury but it does not necessarily happen on the sports field. Many children suffer concussions as an indirect injury, due to whiplash from a car accident or fall, or from a blow to the chest or another part of the body. Many concussions do not involve...

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New Jersey Special Education Statistics

Many parents in New Jersey worry that asking for special help for children with disabilities means pulling those children out of regular school and separating them from friends and classmates. However, the vast majority of students in New Jersey receiving special education benefits still spend a substantial portion of the typical school week in a general education classroom. This is because the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) directs educational institutions to include children with disabilities in regular school activities to the greatest extent possible while still adequately addressing their special needs. According to 2012 statistics provided by the New Jersey Department...

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